Pre-order now for the next shipment from Q36.5 in Italy.

Our Sommet Cycling 2017 kit is now available to pre-order.

We took the plunge on Nick’s design for the 2017 kit recently. We popped aside the numbers needed for the trips and then went about shooting a few to try and flog some to the eager punters out there…yourselves (email Nick to get on the pre-order for the next lot…).

Best laid plans, the kit just about sold out before we even shot the damn stuff. Word of mouth got it flying out but we still got out and shot some stuff, although it was more an abridged shoot before a ride or hijacking a ride.

We had dreamy Ramon fondling Christian’s Speedvagen (while he awaits his own hand built, but titanium, dream bike to arrive – this month!!) and playing air wheel on his very own Enve’s for said build. And we had the Swedish masseuse, Therese, riding up and down Rocacorba in preparation for some daft Everesting challenge. I was happy to be in the car shooting on that one, and hanging off the gliding platform and giving the ‘models’ heart attacks. All part of the job.

Thanks to the kids in the photographs and thanks to Christian and The Service Course for letting us use their place like my very own photo studio; much appreciated as always.

Ian

@themusette_cc

 

We like people who take risks as you know. Calculated risks, seeking to improve on an existing way of life, or existing product. Look at our friends at La Fabrica Girona, Amber and Christian who didn’t just use Girona as a pro season base, they moved to Girona and made it home, and their future.

Look at the Meo’s of Rocket Espresso who left behind New Zealand, moved to Italy and established Rocket as the go to home espresso machine. Especially for cyclists!

And our friend Luigi Bergamo of Q36.5 Absolutely Equipment in Bolzano. He has worked, or rather led, one of the leading technological cycling kit manufacturers for many a year. Yet he felt he could do it better. Felt he wanted to do it better, independently. And so he moved back to his home, and his original cycling club’s home, in Bolzano and gave birth to Q36.5.

We visited the studio, or laboratory, in Bolzano on the end of our Dolomites trip recently. Nick had met Luigi before, whilst I had only spoken on email. He was as nice as Nick had said and I imagined from emails. Friendly, affable, generous (dinner was great, best pizza I have had) and knowledgeable and passionate beyond belief about cycling clothing, his products and brand.

The focus of Q36.5 (Q – quaerere; Italian for research. 36.5 – the temperature of a healthy body) is technical perfection in cycling clothing. To maintain that healthy core body temperature, whatever the weather and exertion, throughout the ride. They still have some cool designs, but it’s not a case of pretty first, then whatever fabrics after. Performance leads, and good looking design is then applied. The devil is in the detail, the research and the collaboration with the best Italian fabric producers.

Details like the use of silver thread to help distribute heat through it’s high conductivity and chase that stable temperature. And collaborating, for example, with an Italian brand, world famous for manufacturing the finest handbags, to fine tune their wallet (Smart Protector). All the little things add up to the best kit we have used.

But we knew that. We haven’t made a secret of our thoughts on that. Visiting the lab only added to that thought, but also made me realise that Luigi is not too different from the sort of people we are drawn to. He was as happy to talk about our dreams and about his happiness at being back in Bolzano. The orange details scattered through his collection are from the orange of his original Bolzano cycling kit, which is framed and hangs on the lab wall. As happy to talk about coffee and pizza and our trip to the Dolomites. And, that priceless value, happy to give us time, not rush, and just talk, as friends. Again, it was us who had to peel away, reluctantly, after a lazy afternoon – and dinner, well fed with that pizza.

We use Q36.5 for many reasons. It’s the best. But also, Luigi is a damn fine guy, who does things with passion, the right way.

 

 

On the way to the Dolomites cycling trip in July (our long read here) we made the most of our time in Italy by visiting Rocket Espresso, on the edge of Milan. Our hosts, Nicky and Andrew Meo – the driving forces and owners of Rocket – opened their factory doors, showed us around and took us for lunch. If Nick and I didn’t have the Dolomites on the horizon, we may never have left.

One of the things I admire in people is risk taking, a leap of faith in life. Think of those who we look at and say, “you’re so lucky!” and often behind that vision is a big decision, a sacrifice, that leap of faith. Nicky and Andrew left a financially comfortable and successful food and coffee business based lifestyle behind in New Zealand and chose a new path; followed their hearts and dreams of oft said ideas to change their lives, and upped and moved to Italy.

In New Zealand, their story was the successful Wellington restaurant, Pravda and roasting house, The Immigrant’s Son and – in as much as there is in such a line of work – a good guarantee of success and income. But restaurant life compromises family life, and there were those dreamlike thoughts of going to Italy. The stars perhaps aligned, right timing, an opportunity, the right connections but then they still had to do it. And so, in 2007, plans were made to take over (with friend and colleague Jeff Kennedy) the struggling Italian firm ECM – parent company of Rocket – and moved the family across the globe.

Condensing 9 years does an injustice to the hard work ironing out operational issues, filling long standing back orders from ECM, aligning and an invaluable partnering with Daniele Berenburch (the son of ECM co-founder), bringing in a bit of Kiwi cultural approaches and re-marketing, re-naming and modernising the whole brand. But therein, plus more, is the overnight success. A 9 year overnight success.

That Kiwi culture has brought open plan offices and open door policies and a new world coffee culture. Melding that with the traditional Italian manufacturing excellence and pride and its own long coffee history of repute has been part of the change and challenge at Rocket.

That crisp clean, bright and relaxed, open plan office area lie within Rocket’s understated factory – from the outside, just another of Milan’s understated factories. On into the Rocket factory itself, even when we were there in a quiet period, there is a gentle hum of organised activity; again, a bright and relaxed environment. I guess that management adage about setting an example from the top rings true. Organised, yet relaxed. And above the factory space is an in house R&D area – itself developing and growing – and a maintenance area; these keep aim to keep them ahead of the game and on top of the existing products.

Most who know of Rocket, know they are tied closely to cycling. My friend Christian Meier, of La Fabrica Girona and Espresso Mafia (see our special October trip), through whom I was introduced to Andrew, is the Spanish dealer for Rocket and it seems the majority of the pro peloton has a Rocket…well, you are faster with a Rocket in your kitchen #fact. Andrew still races his bike, and son – Felix – races in the younger ranks. Indeed Rocket supports various youth riders around the world. I am not sure who is the stronger cyclist of the two, though, Andrew, a self confessed jack of all trades, is probably losing the Italian language race though. Dealing with overseas clients largely (Rocket is a predominantly export firm; Germany, UK and Australasia strong markets), he has a ready made excuse. Nicky is perhaps better, while Felix, practically fluent, is at the head of this New Zealand escape group. Together, clearly, a formidable team.

I am all for taking risks and chasing a change of direction. It’s nice to know that, when I save up for a Rocket, I will know it’s a machine built on dreams, on a risk and on a philosophy of doing things the right way. Life is worth taking risks, Rocket Espresso is a success story as proof.

A long read diary of a recent Sommet Fully Supported Custom journey. This will be on our 2017 calendar, get in while you can. Contact us for more information

Calcium magnesium carbonate. CaMg(CO3)2. 

This is the foundation of dreams. Dreams in the high mountains for all those who love a challenge, beauty and cultural complexity. Cycling paradise. An epic cycling holiday.

The Italian Dolomites are a geographical region of carbonate rocks shared between the provinces of Belluno, South Tyrol and Trentino. The region has been politically and culturally pulled and pushed over the centuries, never more so than in the 20th century with battle lines drawn and families and friendships within towns tested to, and beyond, limits in the highest stakes game of all. War.

Far away from the Alps of Stelvio and Gavia, we spent eight days cycling in, and getting to know, the Italian Dolomites and some of the people. There are more passes to cycle than you can shake a ski pole at but to simply go and ride Monte Grappa, Passos Sella Campolongo, Giau, Pordoi, Rolle, Valles, Falzarego, Valparola, Tre Cime di Lavaredo and the many others we rode would be to miss out on finding out a little about the stuff that make up the culture of the Dolomites.

Thus, rather than chasing from point to point, we stayed in two distinct locations. Feltre and Corvara. And from these we cycled a plenty (about  1,000km and 17,000m for those who like to tot up numbers) – ticking off all those passes and more – in the three provinces of the Dolomites, but immersed ourselves somewhat in the culture. In Italian style, we prepared for the trip by caffeine doping just outside Milan at our friends place, Rocket Espresso…more on that in another post soon.

Feltre welcomed us with blazing sunshine and temperatures around the thirties. A far cry from the history making ascent which was on our first ride. An arrival day loop taking in Croce d’Aune. The scene of Tullio Campagnolo’s, cycling history changing mechanical, when on November, 11, 1927, he couldn’t change out his wheel in a race due to frozen hands and fingers on wing nuts. There must be a better solution he thought. There was and we all benefit from it today. The quick release. Only one of us was riding Campagnolo, myself. It felt appropriate that my Campag front mech, once again, disagreed with my Rotor chainset and threw the chain just as I changed down at the very bottom of Croce d’Aune. Tullio, perhaps, doesn’t like Rotor…the others rode off.

Don’t be fooled by Feltre’s location which on the map seems to be away from the big mountains. The bigger tests. Oh no, we followed up Campag’s history with somewhat grander history of the great Monte Grappa, approaching via the brutal Monte Tomba. Grappa has too much blood on her slopes from both World Wars and a monument at the summit is a stark reminder of the waste of life we have seen too often. We simply had to ride the beast, in beautiful conditions, tasting cheese on the way up, focaccias on the way down and wonderful views all around, with small lakes and vertiginous drop offs, donkeys, hairpins and what a descent. How times have changed, how lucky we are!

With the Dolomites you often think you have topped it all. They are so awe inspiring. Then the next climb, or descent in this case, you get wowed by a road that has been cut into a wall, is technical enough to keep you awake but fun enough to fly down and the loop we stuck on the end of this big Grappa day, after some coffee and strudel, was just that. With the sun descending as gently as we did rapidly towards home, we had gone from amazing, to yells of joy and it was only day two

Another big day ahead the next day. Up to 2,000m twice this time for some of the group. Some took the option to take a shorter, still big, day and peeled off after the incredible lakeside early coffee and strudel stop (again). Blazing sunshine again. That was, until it wasn’t. Pretty soon it was golf ball size rain drops and lightning and thunder only a couple of seconds apart. This was approaching Passo Rolle and Valles and thus the wrong side of the valley to home. There is always a bailout option, for safety and comfort with us. But not today; we voted for a(nother) coffee pause and strudel and hoped for a break in the storm. 40 minutes or so later, a glimpse of blueish sky. The kind the UK sees. Grey. Pay up and off up the mountain up double figure gradients, all the while wondering if the thunder was  closer or farther away. Up and over the both very tough Passo Rolle and Valles and down the other side without a hitch, but the chill on the descent got the better of us and another stop was called. Super thick hot chocolate and a wonderfully courteous host of the bar who brought out blankets for us to warm under. It got us defrosted enough to get home on a cracking power descent to fly home.

We left Feltre with yet more tragic history and more wonderful hospitality. And the sun was back. A rolling ride out around the markets and vineyards to the engineering marvel of Passo San Boldo; built with blood and sweat of women, children and donkeys early last century. On the way stopping in on Roberta’s vineyard outlooking restaurant, with her pride in “the best bread in the world!” and her adoration for my home town of Barcelona was such a contrast to the massive riding of Grappa, Rolle and of what was to come in Corvara. Oh, and fresh pasta lunch atop San Boldo.

Corvara. This is, perhaps, what most people think of when you mention the Dolomites mountains. The beauty of having four days in Feltre and four in Corvara, is the variety of riding; tough and big mountains as well as some rolling hills, leading into 4 days of massive mountains with nary a valley to ride. Either up. Or down. Corvara is the heart of the famous Sella Ronda, starting point for Falzarego, Valparola and the Queen ride for us over to the fairy tale like, brutally steep, Tre Cime di Lavaredo and back over Passo Giau.

We were welcomed to Corvara, with clockwork precision that one expects from this part of Italy, with the biggest crack of thunder of the week as we pulled up outside the wonderful Posta Zirm hotel. And even bigger rain drops than on Passo Rolle.

The change in culture is noticeable as soon as one arrives. Ladino language spoken and on signs, preserving the language and the culture, more Germanic influences and when you speak to people with a family history here – as we did for the whole stay, with the generational family owners of our hotel – you learn of the flux of the cultures that have and go on here; from Italian, Ladino, German, Austrian and within and beyond families and friends within villages, especially in tough times of the last century. Again, how lucky we are, to simply enjoy these mountains.

So, the riding. It rained. Heavily. Thunder storms rang strong. Day one in Corvara we trimmed to only have three passes, mainly for safety, but typically it was beautiful sunshine that afternoon. Surely a good omen of the next day.

Indeed, bright sunshine at breakfast. And the first climb up Falzarego. Sadly, or perhaps not for that epic sense and for some nice photography, the heavens opened and the tough Passo Fedaia was made tougher by the rain, the sheep allowing an excuse for a respite. It stopped for lunch in the restaurant up top, then started again for the descent and for Pordoi and Campolongo. Typical.

Fair to say, the epic was put into the trip on this ride. Shooting from the van and huddled in the gutters in the rain, while prepping hot coffee as well was a joy. We all got wet – the riders far more than the support – but that epic we won’t forget. (Shooting while driving and chasing these fast riders, on mountain descents, in the wet…not recommended, but some nice results and a bit of fun).

But finally. That was the last of it. No more rain. And not too hot. Perfect to assault 150km or so to Tre Cime di Lavaredo via Cortina d’Ampezzo and back over Passo Giau and Campolongo again. Cortina is ok in comparison to Corvara, but then we love Corvara. But we wanted a coffee, so a quickie before off to the paradise of Tre Cime. An incredible, beautiful, brutally steep dead end climb. Formerly the border between Italy and Austria, now between the Italian provinces of Belluno and South Tyrol – yet more evidence of that fluxing history and why there is such a want to preserve the Ladino culture. Words, nor photographs do Tre Cime justice. You have to be there. Feel it. Maybe suffer up, it to really get it. It’s amazing.

And as before, when you think the Dolomites has thrown all it’s wow at you, you go back towards Corvara via Passo Giau. More rideable than Tre Cime, and thus you can soak up the theatre of dolomite rocks towering above you, almost like a giant natural amphitheatre. The road is the play, and you are simply a minor character in that days performance. It’s spectacular. Another long day, beautiful and long. The descent off the top, one of the best. Fast, a bit technical, but fast.

Seven hard amazing days done. Tired legs, tired bodies. How could we muster the energy to ride another 1,700m? Well it was only 50 odd km. And it was the Sella Ronda. Our closing day ride, knowing how stunning it would be, we had all the energy to spin out and enjoy one of the best 50km rides you can do.

The Dolomites are made up of more than CaMg(CO3)2. It’s the history and the people who have lived that history and create it today. To the Dolomites and the people of the areas; grazie, giulan, thank you! We will be back in 2017 with more friends to be wowed.

If you are interested in our 2017 Dolomites trip, drop us a line now. We are building our 2017 calendar and this trip is definitely in there!. domestique@sommet.cc

A little late, but I have a good reason in that I could barely function yesterday after hanging on to Christian Meier’s wheel as he motor paced me around 100+km of stunning Girona countryside. It didn’t help that I tried to stick with him on his hill reps. I managed the shorter ones, but as soon as it got serious…gone. Even the Haribo didn’t save me. Anyway, that’s my excuse for putting this up today.

So, on from last week’s Telegraph Cycling Podcast suggestion, if you are like me a good coffee would go nicely with that listening pleasure. I thought I would pop into this little slot, Rocket Espresso machines, of Milan. They are simply the business. Sadly we don’t have one, yet (hint hint, Andrew!), but I have seen plenty of them and read plenty about them and tasted plenty of coffee from them. And, in case you didn’t know, “with a Rocket Espresso machine in your kitchen you will be faster #fact”. Confirmation I need one.

They are the coffee machine of the Pro cyclists.

Pre and post that wonderful suffering on the bike I was lucky enough to have spectacular coffees from two different Rockets. An Ethiopian from Espresso Mafia’s brand new sparkling white Rocket (I was in Girona for the launch of Espresso Mafia, a whose who of ex-pat Pro Cyclists; Christian and Amber’s latest coffee haven) – then a Nicaraguan from the Rocket in good old La Fabrica. Both made by Christian.

If you can’t get a Rocket for your kitchen, give us a shout and we will get you on the road in Girona via a Rocket coffee from Mafia or La Fabrica. It’s not your kitchen so we can’t guarantee you will be faster…

Sommet for the Weekend. Enjoy Milan Sanremo.

Having spent a bit of time on this website it was perfect timing that a quick weekend break over in Lucca with the good lady coincided with completing it’s launch. It also just so happened to be the same weekend as one of the nicest cycle races on the calendar – the very young Strade Bianche, down the road in Siena. In only in it’s 10th edition, it has already staked a claim to be a genuine classic. Perhaps a future Monument…? It’s certainly one that the big classics riders want to win. Perhaps, none more so than two time winner (at the start) Fabian Cancellara in his last year on the bike as a Pro.

Lucca itself was beautiful and is one of the places we’ve got custom trips being planned for this year. For good reason, it’s a bit like our home trip of Girona. Green, quiet peaceful roads, always undulating and testing. Stunning scenery. The cuisine variety, I reckon, is greater in Girona, but who am I to judge… The good lady was sold straight away and is hankering to live there. Girona, Lucca, tough choices.
For Siena, we took a lazy 90 minute Chianti drive – coffee interrupted in a beautiful village recommended by a friend of a friend who had worked there years ago; well worth it. Even in the grey drizzle and wind (unlike our sunny home!) the drive was beautiful. Off the beaten track, only Italian words in the air, we had escaped completely. Inside Siena’s impressive walls this stunning, incredible city the ambiance was perfect. Just out of tourist season, a little quieter than normal, but with the simmering excitement of the race. Another coffee, focaccia then some massively chocolate laden desert and there was plenty of time (and sugar) to wander over to check out the finish half kilometre. That famous wall of a climb into the city’s even more famous Piazza del Campo.

Strade Bianche_SommetJournal_06

It isn’t a circus like, say, the Tour de France. The small paved streets were still open to wander on the race route itself so we could meander down the hill then crawl back up it at will for a while. The trick, to a degree, is knowing where and how to to get to the city in the first place. After the hill crawling, we picked a spot on said hill, 100 metres or so from the final turn and then waited and soaked up the building crowd and hubbub.
Strade Bianche_SommetJournal_08
If I am not riding my bike, I quite like chasing some races, or popping along the route or to the finish, but it’s so much better if I can immerse myself a little in the place. Chatting with the locals next to you, finding out what is going on in the race coming, slightly confused if you don’t have the lingo perfectly tuned in. Taking photos for people, waving to folk watching from their apartment windows and generally having a good old time. We spotted the Grubers and had a quiet word with them before they got into race-photography mode for the finish. It’s like a quiet street party or reunion which happens to have a bike race.
Strade Bianche_SommetJournal_10
Then it arrived. Etixx and Brambilla leading the way. A big Swiss Trek chasing down. Etixx and Štybar on his wheel. I hoped Brambilla would hold on – we weren’t aware of all the efforts he had put in. The ignorance was bliss. Would Fabs have a fairy tale last Strade Bianche and make it 3 titles. Or would Stybie retain the crown.
Strade Bianche_SommetJournal_17
No idea at the time. You rarely do know on the street. After about a third of the peloton had fought up the wall our new Italian mates alongside us got news of the result. Chapeau Spartacus. A sign for the rest of the Classics season. Look out everyone else, the kid plans on going out in style. And if there was a place to make that statement it is in Italy. They do style quite well.
(And chocolate fancies and often, but don’t be fooled, not always, coffee!).
Words & images by our Ian (themusette.cc)